Monthly Archives: February 2016

SDN Brooklyn @ New York Fashion Week

Only at new NYFW… pink-haired dog sits front row at SDN.

One of our favorites this fashion week was our own Marcus Hicks — the designer behind sustainable and Eco-conscious label SDN Brooklyn. The show was held at the beautiful Dune Studios and the audience was filled stylish and elegant SDN followers.

The black and white collection was minimal but made a point. We saw organic cotton voile long dresses paired with faux fur jackets and one was splattered with red paint followed by model carrying paint can, referencing PETA.

Some looks consisted of cropped suit-vests and jackets made from hemp and woolens, organic cotton fleece hooded dresses and long organic cotton t-shirts.

His very exciting “backward” oxfords, which are designed to appear as if shoes are on the wrong feet while structurally wearable, sound, and comfortable were featured again becoming a signature piece of SND.

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

 

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

SDN Brooklyn NYFW Show Fall/Winter 2016

Photo by: Kristen Walther

 

Marcus_Overhead2_Leather

Fast Fashion is the McDonalds of Fashion

Yes we all enjoy shopping at fast fashion stores because it’s completely accessible and risk free from a monetary perspective. Trendy items can be bought at a fraction of the price of the real designer, and one can easily look as chic as their favorite celeb gracing the cover of the latest InStyle.

fast-fashion-ethical-fashion
However, what about all the controversy surrounding these third world factories that make up the majority of some of the largest retailers in the world?

We often like to ignore certain facts that we have heard over and over again concerning the workers conditions, wages and overall standard of life. I’ve heard many people say “well in that person’s country having a factory job is better than nothing”, or “well it’s good for their economy”. Yes some of these statements can potentially hold some sort of truth, but in actuality many workers are often taken advantage of.  One potential way to spot this issue is by looking at the price of the garment. Yes they can use cheaper materials to avoid higher costs, but labor costs also need to be taken into consideration. Not to mention working conditions in these factories isn’t usually up to code.

By continuing to support these huge conglomerates it’s like we are saying we are OK with mistreating others and taking advantage of their lower wages and willingness to work under such conditions.  As a comparison you could compare this with America’s new realization that eating organic is healthier for you. For a very long time it was all about saving money in the grocery store.  Nowadays people are much more willing to pay a premium for food that is organic, locally sourced, or free range.  People are now on board after so many years of buying cheap food.   Is it because we have suddenly become a richer nation? No! It’s because we are finally more educated about food and the nasty pesticides, preservatives, and mistreatment of animals.

Obviously most people who strive to eat healthy and organic meals don’t necessarily buy ALL organic products which is how we can look at buying fast fashion. Think of it as a process to ease yourself into. Although you might not be able to afford a closet full of luxury designers it’s more about being mindful of your purchases. So maybe this season you buy a few of the nicer trendy items that you happen to find at a fast fashion store, but you make the conscious decision to purchase a staple item that you will wear for many seasons from a higher end designer.

By taking this approach we are at least weaning ourselves off of buying cheap crap that we will wear for a few seasons and then dump at the local goodwill. If we can all start to somewhat adapt the mentality that buying fast fashion is equivalent to buying fast food we can help shape our economy and help these huge corporations see what we really want as consumers.  Of course we now and then want some McDonald’s French Fries, but does that mean we eat there all the time? Absolutely not. Same should be true about shopping at cheap places like Forever 21.  Do you think that grocery stores would be selling sustainable fish or vegan cheese if it wasn’t actually selling? Same goes for fashion. If we all can make a small statement about wanting to know more about where are clothes come from and how they are made, buyers and eventually these huge companies will start taking notice.

So what can we do as consumers to help the economy and be more mindful of our purchases?

Buy small.
If you go to your local boutique, you’re most likely going to find a handful of local designers that might be a tad pricier, but definitely well worth the money in terms of quality and sustainability. Shopping at places like Runway Passport, chances are that these emerging designers are working with smaller suppliers and factories that they have a personal relationship with.  Smaller companies know exactly where their materials are coming from and they most likely have also personally visited the factory.

Be mindful of where your clothing is made and how much it costs.
It doesn’t have to not be made in China, but just be aware of what you are paying for something. If it’s a top that costs $10 and it’s made in China it’s most likely going to fall apart or was made in a factory that takes advantage of it’s workers.

Change the way you think about fashion.
We are constantly bombarded with advertising, and sales for “two-for-one” this and “buy 2 get one free” that. But if we started to change the way we think about fashion, and that it doesn’t need to be so disposable or “getting a good deal” you will begin to look at it the same way you do paying double for a wild Alaskan Salmon as opposed to a farm raised fake salmon.

Overall it’s just about making small changes and choosing to make investments in our wardrobes.  People shouldn’t be considered materialistic if we choose to buy an item that is more expensive.  If we know someone was paid a fair wage in good working conditions, we are doing our part in helping increase awareness of what’s important in this crazy world of fashion.

– by Lauren Tanaka of Global Garbs

Desigual @ New York Fashion Week FW16

Layers, layers, and more layers…at the Desigual show at New York Fashion  Week.

We witnessed an explosion of texture, color, and patterns at this Fall/ Winter 2016 runway show. The collection was inspired by the vibrancy of city life and “its creative lifeblood.”

The models came down the runway wrapped in geometric, floral, and metallic printed outerwear layered over printed brocade knits and topped off with animal friendly bright faux-fur coats and wraps. Some of our favorite looks included and all black-and-white mix of patterns coat that stole the show. Paired with some of the outfits were vegan leather backpacks, printed sheer gloves and suede pouch bags.

Along with such vibrant and vital patterns we were definitely all about the vegan animal friendly style.

desigual new york fashion  week

 

desigual new york fashion week

 

desigual new york fashion week

desigual new york fashion week

desigual new york fashion week

desigual new york fashion  week

John Paul Ataker at New York Fashion Week

John Paul Ataker, who just presented his collection at New York Fashion Week, is best known for elegant evening wear as well as for creating his own high end textiles throughout the world.

Based out of Instanbul, the core concept of the John Paul Ataker House is the flawless craftsmanship and influence of couture. Since 2012, the Creative Director, Numan Ataker, transformed the intricate designs into ready to wear clothing under the John Paul Ataker label.

During this show, we had the opportunity to experience the fashion forward, carefully designed collection of John Paul Ataker at his finest. The fabrics and delicate details and finishes made each outfit complete, special and unique.

Below are some of our favorite looks from the runway show chosen for the small details we noticed and loved the most.

John Paul Ataker new york fashion week

John Paul Ataker new york fashion week

John Paul Ataker new york fashion week

DURAN LANTINK BACKSTAGE PHOTOS @ AMSTERDAM FASHION WEEK

Fashion Photographer Giusy de Ceglia
Click here for runway photos
Click here for full interview and story about Duran Lantink

Duran Lantink has presented a stunning collection inspired by “Sistaaz of the Castle”, a project he developed with photographer Jan Hoek about a group of transgender sex workers and their quirky clothing choices in the streets of Cape Town, South Africa.

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

Duran Lantink Runway Photos @ Amsterdam Fashion Week

Fashion Photographer Giusy de Ceglia
Click here for backstage photos
Click here for full interview and story about Duran Lantink

Duran Lantink has presented a stunning collection inspired by “Sistaaz of the Castle”, a project he developed with photographer Jan Hoek about a group of transgender sex workers and their quirky clothing choices in the streets of Cape Town, South Africa.

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

 

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 BACKSTAGE – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 - Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

DURAN LANTINK FW 2016-17 – Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week F/W 2016-17. Copyright: Giusy de Ceglia

Duran Lantink Interview with Amsterdam Fashion Week Designer

Fashion Photographer Giusy de Ceglia
Click here for runway photos.
Click here for backstage photos

Duran Lantink has presented a stunning collection inspired by “Sistaaz of the Castle”, a project he developed with photographer Jan Hoek about a group of transgender sex workers and their quirky clothing choices in the streets of Cape Town, South Africa.

Outcome of this unique project have been Duran’s collection at Amsterdam Fashion Week and Jan’s photos, which are currently being featured in several exhibitions in Holland and abroad.

The local Cape Town sex workers association S.W.E.A.T. gave Duran Lantink and Jan Hoek the opportunity to meet and collaborate with their transgender support group Sistaazhood. For this project, Duran and Jan zoomed in specifically on six girls they have met there: Coco , Cleopatra, Sulaiga, Gabby, Flavinia, and Joan Collins.

Most of them are homeless and living under a bridge next to the castle of Cape Town. Duran Lantink found his own creative approach to clothes’ making had plenty in common with that of the girls, who use second hand garments often found in the streets to bring beautiful outifits to life.

Duran’s show has brought up deep emotions and even tears in the attending press and public, gaining a standing ovation at the end and becoming a major highlight of the latest Mercedes-Benz Amsterdam Fashion Week edition

HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE INTRODUCED TO RUNWAY PASSPORT’S READERS AND FOLLOWERS?

Of course I would like to be introduced as Duran Lantink. But style wise I think about street couture. I use different recycling methods and collage techniques to represent street style. Who are we? And how do we represent? Of course, nowadays everything is more mixed up – I am looking for the DNA of street ware. Second hand clothes, deserve a second life, for example high-end luxury brands fused with clothes from a trash pile.

HOW WAS YOUR EXPERIENCE AT AMSTERDAM FASHION WEEK AND IN WHICH WAY WAS IT DIFFERENT FROM THE PREVIOUS ONES?

Well, I have to admit this project is the biggest show that I ever created. We had almost 60 models in the show, and several disciplines were combined into one final piece. My collaboration with Jan Hoek was very special to me for realising the project. It gave me the opportunity me to steer in between the different disciplines and categories.

YOUR SHOW HAS BEEN ACCLAIMED BY PRESS AND PUBLIC ALIKE – AND DEEPLY TOUCHED THE AUDIENCE FOR THE STORY BEHIND IT. COULD YOU TELL US MORE ABOUT WHAT INSPIRED IT AND YOUR COOPERATION WITH THE PHOTOGRAPHER JAN HOEK? 

We found a photo on the internet of a trans sex worker in South Africa. She dragged us away, because she look really cool. Her clothes were really improvised and raw, but so stunning and creative at the same time. In the end we decided to travel to Cape Town and track down trans sex workers to photograph. Via Sweat, a sex worker advocacy organisation, we met Sulaiga, Gabby, Flavirina, Coco, Cleopatra and Joan Collins. We asked each of them to brainstorm their dream outfits. And I tried to recreate their ultimate fantasy. Then Jan took photo’s of the six in their dream look.

HOW DID THE SHOW AFFECT YOU AT A PERSONAL LEVEL? BEING SUCH AN EMOTIONALLY CHARGED PROJECT, IT MUST HAVE IMPACTED YOU AT DIFFERENT LEVELS.

There has never been a more necessary time than now for such a project. It is shocking on one hand that in Africa the subject is really inappropriate. On the other hand I am happy that the Dutch people took this project so well. It is really double charged. As the fashion show and exhibition will travel to South Africa we really van confront the subject. This subject should not be kept quiet under any circumstances.

HOW DID YOU SELECT THE MODELS FOR THIS SHOW? WE THOUGHT THEY WERE VARIED AND VERY SPECIAL. 

What interests me is multi-cultural or even better said trans-nationalities. To be honest I was really shocked by the fact that most Dutch modelling agencies did not have dark skinned models in their selections. I wonder if the fashion industry will be reconstructed as at the same speed the world turns.

WHAT WENT THROUGH YOUR HEAD RIGHT BEFORE THE SHOW AND RIGHT AFTER?

To be honest I can really enjoy the pressure that roams around backstage. It was like being on a playground with so many characters and types of people. Something magical was going on there: in the few hours of preparation we became a family and we realized that, it was more than fashion. This was the place where al the bits and pieces came together into one pure statement. I was proud of everyone.

EACH LOOK YOU PRESENTED WAS QUITE POWERFUL AND UNIQUE. IS THERE ONE IN PARTICULAR THAT MEANS A LOT TO YOU?

I feel that every single outfit is important to me. The outfits gave the girls the chance to express their world. The world they shared with me and Jan. The looks are not about being extravagant or insane, but about the reflection of personality of the girls.

NOW THAT IT’S ALL OVER, WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE PAST WEEK? 

Well, Having my first gin tonic after two months.

Jan and I are fascinated by the overlapping between the models and the trans genders girls from South-Africa. They were all great, at one moment I was trilled because my memory from Cape Town became reality again.

Next year the exhibition and fashion show will travel to South Africa. I am so curious how the project will be accepted in the continent. I leave the others to judge, the only thing we can do is write a new chapter.

Jef Montes Interview with Amsterdam Fashion Week Designer

Fashion Photographer Giusy de Ceglia
Click here for runway photos.
Click here for backstage photos

HOW WOULD YOU BEST INTRODUCE YOURSELF TO RUNWAY PASSPORT’S READERS AND FOLLOWERS?

As an artist rather than a clothing designer, who’s seeking boundaries in fashion through my presentations, I follow my own instinct and my personal view on aesthetics without being limited by the practical requirements clothing has. When I start designing a collection, I start with a story. This story develops into a particular image in my head and eventually this will be converted to design.

I start with an image and don’t consider portability. When working on a collection, I use the immersion from former collections and knowledge from my previous research. It all becomes one continuing process. Material development remains the focus point in all my collections and I try to challenge myself to experiment with apocalyptical material manipulations, and specifically the possibility of the sculptural shaping of the material.

I studied Fashion Design at ArtEZ Institute of the Arts in Arnhem and I graduated in 2012 with a honours degree. During my studies at the academy, I developed a fascination for light and especially the effect light has on materials. Light has become the overarching factor of my work. For my dissertation thesis I collected all kinds of objects to which I felt a personal connection. Most of the objects were from my Spanish background, e.g. porcelain statues, communion candles and miniature ships. Especially their shape and shine has become the basis of my signature work, whereas my drive for experiments is the main part of my signature work. It can be seen in every collection I made. I’m fascinated by ‘experiment on stage’ and it’s my goal to develop one design directly on the catwalk in every collection . RESOLVER was a total collection experiment on stage.

HOW WAS YOUR EXPERIENCE AT AMSTERDAM FASHION WEEK AND IN WHICH WAY WAS IT DIFFERENT FROM THE PREVIOUS ONES?

This year was a exciting experience due to the tight schedule I worked on. In earlier collections I sometimes made the wrong choices concerning time schedules and communication, which resulted in something different from that that I had hoped for. It created chaos and obscurity. But it gave me the opportunity to learn and now I’m able to use that knowledge and my judgment in order to get myself and my team a better result. I feel like one needs all these experiences to learn each other’s ways and languages to be able to get better results in the future collections. For me, RESOLVER is such a result. For this show we had quite a few challenges, but it worked out really well.

YOUR SHOW – “RESOLVER'” – HAS BROUGHT UP MIXED EMOTIONS AND SHARP COMMENTS FROM WITHIN THE FASHION INDUSTRY. THE MOST CONSIDERED IT A MASTERPIECE, OTHERS WERE PUZZLED OR FOUND IT EVEN DISTURBING. WHAT IS YOUR TAKE ON ALL THE BUZZ THE SHOW CAUSED?

In times where fashion seems to revolve around quotes such as ‘Fashion is Dead’ (Li Edelkoort) and ‘Why fashion is crashing’ (Suzy Menkes), I think a lot about my future as a designer. Resolver is Spanish for ‘to solve’, and stands for a new fresh start. My label gives me the freedom to create my own aesthetic reality and rules – this season I wanted to start with a clean slate by literally resolving garments. What is left? A blank page, the bare-naked truth, purity and love. RESOLVER is an abstract and highly personal response to the current speed of the fashion industry. It was my goal to create a buzz, because it was a collection meant for the press. What is left of the garments is too little to use in a showroom or to be lend to stylists. It was purely meant as a statement. And I’m glad that the show brought up mixed emotions, because it means that it makes people think and even encourages new awareness.

HAVE YOU HAD AT ANY POINTS DOUBTS ABOUT YOUR PLANS FOR THE “RESOLVER” SHOW? WERE THERE MOMENTS WHEN YOU THOUGHT IT MIGHT HAVE NOT WORKED THE WAY YOU WANTED TO AND HOW DID YOU OVERCOME THEM?

The main challenge was the material. Together with the Textiellab in Tilburg (lab for fabrics) I developed a dissolvable fabric. This fabric consist of polyvinyl alcohol and cotton which dissolves in water. The threads are woven into a cloth in such a way that the dissolvable layer was on top of the cotton layer. The idea to weave it this way was a result from two former collections of mine. My First collection ILLUMINOSA was focused on pigment and my second collection VELERO was focused on the melting procedure.

When throwing water on the new fabric, it firstly would obtain a kind of a black spot (like ink) and then it would dissolve. The Textiellab donated 50 metres of this fabric which I used to create 17 garments. When testing the dissolvable fabric in Tilburg we used only a one layer garment even though the collection consisted of multi layered garments. Sometimes garments even consisted out of six layers. My biggest concern of course was whether the multi layers would prevent the garment to dissolve the way I had envisioned beforehand. I even instructed my team backstage to rip the garments in case they wouldn’t dissolve the right way. But the magic happened on the runway and when I saw the almost naked models I was euphoric. It was so much better than I had envisioned.

WHAT DID YOU DO BACKSTAGE TO ENERGIZE THE MODELS FOR THE RUNWAY FOR THIS SPECIFIC SHOW? WERE THERE ANY “CRAZY MOMENTS” LEADING UP TO IT?

Originally I had plans for this experiment in July during the Future Generation, but due to the policy of the model agencies I worked with ,it couldn’t happe, so I had to postpone this collection. This time my fantastic team managed to find beautiful models who dared to go naked on the runway. Of course some of the models were nervous, some were afraid about whether the balloons would crack and others about walking naked on the runway. Just before the show some of the balloons cracked because the water inside was too warm and we had to change the temperature of the water a little. But the risk of cracking too early was still there and that was very thrilling. Apart from the foreseen obstacles, there were a few that arose on the runway during the show. The dissolving garments left threads that sometimes went between the model’s toes and the water made the runway slippery. ‘Fashion dying on stage and models crashing like fashion’. But the models handled their responsibilities perfectly and it was a great feeling to realize that everyone was so committed to perform this show the best they could.

WHAT WENT THROUGH YOUR HEAD RIGHT BEFORE THE SHOW AND RIGHT AFTER?

Just moments before the show I felt all the adrenaline going through me and I was very curious to see how the collection would dissolve and what it would look like in the end. One week before the show all the garments were finished and we made photos of models wearing the garments. Then I got a little scared about destroying the garments because I thought they were interesting enough as they were at the time. So just before the show started I had this ‘kill your darlings’ feeling, but I needed to do it to complete this experiment. Right after the show I was so euphoric because my vision came through. What is left of the garments is like pieces of contemporary art.

NOW THAT IT’S ALL OVER, WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE PART OF THE PAST WEEK?

My favorite part of the past week was that my collection was destroyed in a successful way. The audience was very impressed by the show and even grabbed fabric from the runway and took it home. This was a big compliment to me. At the end of the show I got a splash of water thrown over me, this was liberating and felt like a fresh beginning of a new creative chapter. Also the love I felt from my team was amazing; everybody was blown away by the result.

YOU ARE KNOWN FOR BEING QUITE THE ARTIST AND NOT ONLY A GREAT DESIGNER. WHAT IS YOUR NEXT PLAN TO MERGE ART AND FASHION OR YOUR NEXT ARTISTIC PLAN?

My next artistic plan will be designing my new collection TORMENTA, with the focus on the unravelling process. Tormenta is the Spanish word for storm and I will present it in Paris this year.

WHAT COMES NEXT NOW, GENERALLY SPEAKING?

I want to cross the borders and show my work more internationally. Up until now I needed to do everything in the Netherlands for my evolution. By making mistakes and doing research I feel like now is the time to expand outside the Netherlands. I also look forward to experience different interdisciplinary collaboration in other countries. I hope to find more investors so I can continue experimenting with limitless creativity and showing more collections in the future. For me it is good to have a direction, but on the other hand I want to be open to unforeseen events because in the end I am someone who listens to his inner feelings.